On Screen

On Under the Open Sky & Interview with Dir. Miwa Nishikawa

『素晴らしき世界』, 2020, 126min. (directed by Miwa Nishikawa)

FALLEN

The theme of finding a second chance (and losing it), of a transformative encounter, has made its way in the films of director Miwa Nishikawa and in the characters of the widowed husband of The Long Excuse, the young medical graduate in the Red Beard-like Dear Doctor, and the released yakuza of her recent Under the Open Sky.

Ms. Nishikawa has commented on, and dealt with, the inevitable legacy of her years as Hirokazu Koreeda’s assistant-director (1), expressing a desire similar to that of her mentor, to select stories for which she has an affinity and wants to tell using filmmaking. Those stories are grounded in contemporary reality and explore distinct social classes and settings. While she has written the screenplay for Under the Open Sky, it is her first adaptation (a ‘true story’ book, Mibuncho, by Ryuzo Saki.) It lists the torments of a yakuza trying to reform after being freed from prison. The structure of the tale is meticulous and deftly textured, moving from suffocation to comedy. Gangster Mikami is placed/caged in a one-room flat, going out for groceries, applying himself to keep his place clean, and making sure to take his blood pressure pills. 

And then there is the story about the yakuza who goes to the employment center and gets asked about his résumé… there is a dream, a truck-driving dream, that doesn’t go anywhere. Miwa Nishikawa’s directing is subtle and seamless, rather than displaying the craft itself within the narrative, as one finds in the films of Naomi Kawase or Kiyoshi Kurosawa. The cinematography is masterful and the editing allows itself to daringly vary the length of scenes, though at times these are signaled by overt musical cues. All of this makes for a portrait of a marginalized individual trying to make his way into a system that leaves very little room for a margin. Unsurprisingly, Mikami needs his pills as freedom allows him a perimeter in which hope doesn’t fit in, until it gets the better of him and he falls.

There is another story being told through Yakusho Koji’s performance, a last hurrah for the yakuza code. This materializes itself when Mikami is allowed space, and darkness, at night. There is the manifestation of chivalry when he comes to the rescue of the little guy, the salaryman persecuted by two hoods that have replaced the traditional gangster figure. Mikami’s rage explodes and a formerly reprehensible representation of an eroded onscreen masculinity is released, until the hero quivers and again needs his medication. The second display emphasizes our place as spectator, as we find ourselves witnessing the traditional clan introduction. Mikami has been slighted by the loud noise of his neighbors, two very young men playing video games. As he complains, trash bag in his hand, another man reveals himself, challenging Mikami, mimicking the tone and language of the yakuza. Nishikawa has him follow Mikami outside and frames the courtyard as an arena in which a duel is about to take place. Mikami crouches, arm and hand extended as he recites his résumé. It is a history of violence that makes that impersonator flee. And when all has conspired into pushing him back into the arms of his Kyushu crime family, he finds its leader, his aniki, castrated by soft living and diabetes, and an entourage of dim-witted subordinates who have little talent for code and who promptly manage to have the police arrest the lot of them while Mikami was enjoying the local sento. There is another story waiting to be written and shot on the demise of the yakuza figure, not simply as a social figure, but as a filmic emblem that contemporary Japanese cinema has unwittingly emasculated. The story of another pill.

S.

1- And key collaborator at Koreeda’s production company, Bunbuku.


The Lone Wolf Conundrum

Under the Open Sky, whether intentionally or not, makes references to a wide range of recent Japanese titles while finding its roots in Ryuzo Saki’s novel Mibuncho. It shares the same ex-con rehabilitation theme with the manga-to-film adaption The Scythian Lamb (2017, Daihachi Yoshida). While only a few characters know about the past of the six strangers brought to a small town in the latter,  protagonist Mikami’s history (Yakusho Koji) in Under the Open Sky is no secret within his neighborhood. This makes his integration into the community a challenge not only for himself but also for the people around him. According to director Miwa Nishikawa, this is one of the major questions she wants to ask through the film: what can and should ordinary people do to help former inmates rejoin society? 

Mikami is depicted as a lone wolf, poorly connected to a sense of society and family. Although well-connected due to decades of yakuza involvement, he no longer belongs to any clan. This echoes Ogami, another character the actor played a couple of years ago (The Blood of Wolves, 2018, dir. Kazuya Shiraishi), who leads a yakuza/detective double life, moving around across the borderline and only abiding by his own rules. The wording “lone wolf” is even directly included in its Japanese title 孤狼の血. Both characters take the path of self-marginalization, and feel comfortable enough to stay inside the periphery of the mainstream. Both connote a middle-age longing to run away from the highly ordered everyday life, to reinstall the rōnin legend within contemporary society,while inwardly grieving for the loss of affectionate bonds. While Ogami dies heroically at the hand of yakuzas, Mikami’s life comes to an abrupt end when he’s still struggling between his own set of rules and those of society. He had just managed to make a further step into the “normal life” by working at a nursing home. As hinted towards the end, had he lived, this normal existence would not have been any simpler than the one within the yakuza world that he was used to.

Throughout the film, Mikami receives support from people in various sectors, notably his lawyer, his old time yakuza brother, the supermarket manager, and the novelist/tv program director. At the same time, he’s constantly on a quest to find the mother who abandoned him at an orphanage as he rebuilds the connection with his ex-wife. Within his relationship network, it seems that social connections are only possible with men whereas women only appear as objects of affection. Here is one thing that the yakuza past didn’t teach him: integration into the society is doomed to be a conundrum if the brotherhood is the only way of making connections. Clearly, this is not only Mikami’s problem.

Z.


Interview with Dir. Miwa Nishikawa

1- Koji Yakusho has played the released convict several times, including in The Third Murder by Koreeda 2017. What is it about him that makes directors want to cast him over and over in such a role?

N: Indeed Mr. Yakusho has played a prisoner in Shohei Imamura’s The Eel, as well as many roles of criminals and murderers. On the other hand, he has also played many roles of humanistic leaders and soldiers, as well as great historical figures. He has also played the role of an ordinary businessman. In that sense, I think he is the actor with the widest range of roles in Japan. One thing that Director Kore-eda and I both agreed on was that there is a part of Mr. Yakusho that evokes a kind of unfathomable darkness or madness, and that is a role that he used to play several times before his 40s. We often talked about how we would like to cast Mr. Yakusho again if there was an opportunity for such a role, and in the case of Kore-eda, he achieved his goal with The Third Murder, then I invited him for Under the Open Sky.

2- Under the Open Sky was your first adaptation of someone else’s work. Could you talk about what the process was for you? How did you, as novelist and filmmaker, come to agree on the final screenplay?

N: I had written my own original stories for all five of my feature films, but after those five, I started to feel a bit stuck in the rut of writing stories based solely on my own life experiences and the internal conflicts that I had faced. I happened to come across Ryuzo Saki’s “Mibuncho” at a time when I was wondering if another new story would come out of me.

Mr. Saki’s work Vengeance is Mine was made into a film by Shohei Imamura, and I loved both the film and the novel. When I encountered Mibuncho, at the time of his death and read it, the impact was completely different from that of Vengeance is Mine. Instead of a story about gruesome crimes, it’s about people who committed crimes in the past and went through so much trouble just to get back to their normal lives. It’s the first time I’ve come across a story from that point of view that’s been portrayed with such care, and it’s an idea that I would never have come up with on my own. In order to improve my career as a screenwriter and director, I decided to take on this new challenge of scripting a story based on existing literature.

3- Would you ever consider doing a remake or new adaptation of a film such as Vengeance is mine?

N: I think Imamura is a filmmaker who has really come to grips with the fact that human beings were unfathomable after the war, and I respect him very much for that power. Nowadays, people tend to think that a film has to portray a human figure that is easy to understand in order to be a hit, or to divide the story and the characters into good and evil, but I think that what a film can express is much richer and more complex. Under the Open Sky is not a bloody film like Vengeance is Mine, but I was aware of the difficulty and complexity of human existence when making the film.

4- The sequence in which Mikami returns to his yakuza brother is short, intense, and merciless. You emasculate the yakuza idea very quickly. Is this your perception of them today, this loss of power and influence, including as a subject in cinema?

N: The laws regarding the yakuza have changed a lot in the past 10 years, and they used to exist in a society where everyone tolerated them, but now they are completely shut out from society. I think it would be better if the yakuza disappeared from the world, but on the other hand, they were the only group that sheltered those who could not live in the public eye. The law told them to quit being a yakuza and shut them out, but the society did not take care about how to let them return to society after quitting. I’m sure there are many fans of old Japanese yakuza films all over the world, but I think that the glamour and the darkness of the yakuza world, which everyone yearns for, has all but disappeared. People who used to be a kind of social evil are now becoming vulnerable as they have nowhere else to go. It’s not something I’ve been aware of for a long time, but I’ve been doing a lot of research since I came across the novel, and I’ve been talking to former gangsters about the difficulties of living as a normal person in the society after getting out of the gang. That’s how I developed the script.

In Japan, yakuza films have almost disappeared. By a strange coincidence, this year there will be three films with a yakuza motif being released: Yakuza and the Family, which is being shown now, my film, and The Blood of Wolves 2 directed by Kazuya Shiraishi, which will probably be released in August. Films that are about the glory of the yakuza belong to the past, and the yakuza are now in a state of complete disarray — I think all the 3 titles depict this. The yakuza is no longer a figure to admire, and Ken Takakura no longer exists in Japan.

5- Your mentor Koreeda came from documentary television, at a time when it was still possible to make different programs. In your film, the doc filmmaker/novelist & producer team embody something very different, something more ruthless and more commercial. Then the novelist refuses to go that way, and deeply mourns the passing of Mikami. What is he mourning? A father figure, the symbol of something disappearing in Japan, or a social system that doesn’t exist anymore.

N: Difficult question… (laugh)… I don’t know if this is a direct answer to your question, but there is a real life individual for this novel, and the author Ryuzo Saki wrote iy after four years of working with him. At first, that person sent him a mibuncho (identity book) and asked him to use it as the basis for a novel. It’s said that in the beginning Mr. Saki himself was fed up with having such a sales pitch again. But after all, it’s a potentially dangerous figure who has no relatives and no one to rely on, and if he were to commit another crime, he might do it again. I think he gradually became a person that Mr. Saki couldn’t leave behind, even though he was with him to write the novel in the first place. If you look at a person who has done so many bad things that no one cares about him anymore, who has been forgotten by everyone, and if you stay very close to him, he can become an irreplaceable person for everyone. When I read that book, I thought that there is nothing meaningless in human existence, so I wanted the audience to look closely at the existence of people who are often said to be unnecessary in society. 

6- Is looking at Mikami using fiction easier now than doing a documentary on him?

N: I’m not a documentary filmmaker, but a director of fiction films, so naturally I depicted them in the style of fiction films. While it is very persuasive to shoot real people and tell the story based on social themes, it is also something that people in society don’t want to see, and I think it is a theme that they want to turn a deaf ear to. That’s why I thought that by depicting it as a dramatic film with a certain entertainment value, along with the charm of the actors, it would be easier to reach people who were not at all interested in such things. I think that’s the difference between the roles of fiction and documentary. I tried to make it accessible to a large number of people through the form of fiction.

7- How different would it be if Mikami was a female?

N: Female? I’ve never thought about it (laugh). It would be a totally different life. First of all, I think there is a huge difference in the number of criminals between women and men. Although I just said it would be completely different, the difficulty of starting a new life on one’s own without any family or anyone else to rely on when one gets out of prison is quite difficult for women too, even if they don’t resort to violence like Mikami did. I think there is a suffocating feeling of living with your past dragging you down for a long time. Let me think about the question. It’s a really interesting one. I hadn’t thought about it at all, but I’m sure there would be different difficulties if it’s a woman. 

8- You made your first film as director in 2003, Hebi Ichigo/Wild Berries. In your view, has the Japanese film scene become more open to women directors? What significant change have you noticed?

N: I don’t think there was any drastic change like in Europe and the U.S. However, the number of female directors is definitely on the rise. In the past, in order to become a film director in Japan, it was necessary to work as an assistant director for a long time. It’s the usual course to finally become a film director after accumulating 10 to 20 years of experience. However, with the change in filming equipment, there are more opportunities to present your talent in a more compact way, even if you don’t have such a career as a crew member, which I think is the reason that the number of young female directors has actually increased. But if you ask me whether the film industry as a whole is making any effort to increase the number of female directors, I haven’t seen it yet. It is true that not only directors but also technical staffs need to have a certain level of accumulated experiences to excel in their positions. Although there are more and more women among technical staffs, I have seen many of them give up the challenging workload on a film set while balancing marriage, family and raising children. I have seen many women who are excellent, hardworking, and talented retire for the family. I think that if producers and investors do not understand the difficulty and do not change the environment, it will be difficult for women to continue working not just as directors, but also cinematographers, lighting technicians, and sound recordists.

8.2- Is the situation the same for female actors?

N: I think female actors have been able to continue working when they age, even in Japan. But I think there is also the backing of their agencies. Even if you give birth to a baby or get married, there are people who will protect you if you enjoy a position above a certain level. On the contrary, almost all the crew staffs are freelancers. So they have to protect their livelihoods on their own, and in that sense it must have been difficult for some of them to continue. However, as the number of women and young staff members continues to increase, if we continue to be involved in film in various ways, the figures will slowly display signs of change.

9- Several of your peers have made films outside Japan, notably in France. Is this something you would also care to attempt?

N: I think it depends on the motif. I don’t mean to say that I will never make a film outside Japan, but I was born in Japan and I know only Japanese language and culture. If you ask me if I could write a French home drama, I think I would have a lot of trouble, because even the way to make coffee in the morning would be different. However, if there is a necessity as a motif, I may try to do so.

9.2- If you start making films overseas, will they still be stories about Japanese?

N: For now I can’t imagine a film without Japanese characters. There may be a film that has both Japanese and non-Japanese.

10- Could you speak a little about having casted Meiko Kaji in the film? What was the experience like of directing her? She is of course famous for her ‘prison’ movies; how would you describe what she represents in Japanese film history?

N: Of course, I know she is very famous overseas. I think she is an actress from anera when she was surrounded by men in a very strict studio system and worked like a craftsman. She is extremely experienced, but once she is on the set, she really works as one part of the filmmaking, very remarkable, and will absolutely follow the director’s instructions. She was a very humble actress with the unique strength and attitude of an actor who has experienced such a fast and hard filmmaking process in the past. However, she also has a sense of humor, and although most of her past works were hard roles, Ms. Kaji has the softness and humor revealed in the role she played in Under the Open Sky. She is a charming person that I would love to work with again if I had the chance.

11- Many of the Japanese contemporary filmmakers that are famous overseas including Hirokazu Koreeda, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Naomi Kawase or Takashi Miikeare 20th Century filmmakers. You are a 21st Century filmmaker. What do you think is the difference not only in filmmaking but also how you look at Japan and the stories you want to tell about Japan compared to that generation?

N: I’ve never been asked before about this. Difficult question.

I think that directors like Kore-eda, Kurosawa, and Kawase all have a great deal of originality, and I came into the film industry as an assistant when they were becoming active as directors. I was brought up with the idea that I should be an auteur and come up with original film projects. So I think there is probably not much difference with them. Although Dir. Kawase, Dir. Kurosawa, and Dir. Kore-eda sometimes make films based on existing works, I believe that their choice of motifs is based on their individual personalities and philosophies, and in that sense, I take the same stance when making films.

That being said, I think that the nature of the film market is changing, both in Japan and around the world, compared to the time when such directors were recognized worldwide. In the 21st century, especially after 2010, there is a great demand and expectation for films to be economically vital, that to be able to make profits. I think that the era when auteur directors were valued is passing away. Therefore, the number of people who make films from a stance like mine is very small, and unless there are people around you with a strong understanding of your work, you won’t be able to continue. I’m fortunate that I’m able to make films in the way I choose, but I think that in the future, maybe I will have to learn how to make money in a balanced way. Filmmaking is very difficult.

12- If we could return to Yakusho Koji, he is often perceived overseas as perhaps one of the last of a generation, a last great Japanese actor after actors Ken Ogata and Tatsuya Nakadai. To your mind, is Yakusho the last symbol of that 20th century acting in Japan?

N: I believe that Mr. Yakusho is, in all likelihood, the best actor in Japan today, and I don’t think there is any other actor who reaches that level. Dir. Imamura, Dir. Kurosawa, and Dir Kore-eda, and me, we are of different generations, but Mr. Yakusho has been able to act in our films for a long time, he is the kind of actor that we want to entrust ourselves to. So I feel that Mr. Yakusho’s reign will continue for a little while longer. To this generation of directors he is probably the best, and young actors are taking him as a model when thinking about their own performances. I hope that after him another symbol will emerge, and I think he probably thinks the same way.

13- In your film, there is a powerful symbol expressed through the yakuza character Mikami. We’ve mentioned his weakness, surviving with those pills that he has to take for his blood pressure. Often in yakuza films, the yakuza heroes, such as played by Takakura Ken, have heroic deaths. But this time, Mikami simply falls because he drops his pills. And it also seems like the collapse of something, the end of something.

N: I think you’re right. In a sense, the glamorous and admirable yakuza films where Ken Takakura put up with a lot of pressure to protect someone and finally dies heroically by cutting into the organization all by himself is not realistic in Japan any more. Culturally it’s sad. The beauty of chivalry found in a certain type of yakuza society, that used to be popular, is disappearing.

14- How long does it take you between films to find your next subject or story? There are filmmakers like Dir. Kurosawa or Dir. Miike who want to shoot all the time. How long does it take you to feel you are ready for the next project?

N: Around 3 to 5 years. It’s been commented as the same pace as the Olympics.

I’ve heard about Dir. Miike, how he never turns down any offer from anyone, and that he himself takes pride in directing all kinds of films. Whereas I have to find the subject matter myself, and if I don’t know about it, I walk around and research it myself. And I write a little slower than others. It takes me about two years to find a subject and write the script, and another year to shoot and finish it, then one year to travel around the world to release it. So it is at least a four-year cycle.

15- Would it be easier for you to stop making films or to stop writing novels?

N: I think one can stop making films anytime they want. It’s very difficult to get a big budget for a film like mine, and the staff around me must be under a lot of pressure to make it. However, if I were asked to choose just one, I would choose film without hesitation. It’s ok to not write novels anymore. Writing novel is a method to build up my strength and to keep my writing ability from waning, and to make my films better. I get a lot from writing novels, but filmmaking is a much steeper mountain for me that I’d like to keep trying.

16- Do you like to watch a lot of films between your two projects? If yes, is there one director that you like in particular? Or you don’t look at films at all?

N: It depends on the schedule, but in general I watch a lot of other people’s films.

In terms of directors from the same Asian region, I am very much encouraged by Lee Chang-dong and Bong Joon-ho. They make films in completely different directions, but I think they have shown the world the breadth of Asian cinema, so I often find courage in their new works. I enjoyed works such as Parasite and Burning very much. I recently saw The Rider by Chloe Zhao—I haven’t seen her latest work yet—who happens to have Asian origins as well. She is active in the U.S. and doesn’t shoot with an Asian motif—we are not talking about nationalities here—but I think as a young director she has expanded the possibilities of fictional films. I am inspired by the works of all these directors, and I want to catch up with them and apply what I get from them to make my own work more fertile.

Interview by S_Z

February 2021

Translated from the Japanese by Z.


西川美和監督インタビュー

1。役所広司さんは、西川監督今回の作品も是枝監督の『三度目の殺人』(2017年)も含め、受刑者や元受刑者を何度も演じられました。その原因はなんでしょうか。役所さんの気質でしょうか。

そう言われてみればという印象なんですが私の目では。役所さんは確かに今村昌平監督の『うなぎ』の受刑者の役もそうですし、殺人の経験のある人間であるとか犯罪者の役も多くやられている一方で、たくさんのすごいこう、なんというんでしょう、ヒューマニズムに満ちたリーダーとか軍人の役もやっておられますし、歴史上の偉人の人物もやられていますし、非常にノーマルなサラリーマンの役もやられますし。そういう意味では日本で一番役幅の広い俳優なのではないかなと思います。私も是枝監督も共通して言っていたのは、「役所さんの中にはちょっと底知れない闇とか狂気みたいなものを感じさせる部分があって、それは特に役所さんが40代以前によくおやりになっていた役だと思うんですけれども、そういう役が欠けたときにはもう一回役所さんをキャスティングしたいよね」という話は私と是枝監督はしばしば雑談で出ていましたので、是枝監督の場合は『3度目の殺人』という作品でその目標を達成されましたし、私は今回お願いしたという経緯です。

2。『素晴らしき世界』は西川監督にとって初めての小説の映画化ですが、そのプロセスについてお聞かせください。小説家として、また映画監督として、どのように完成版の脚本にたどり着かれたのでしょうか。

今まで長編映画5本をすべて自分のオリジナルの物語で書いてきたんですけれども、やっぱり自分の人生経験であるとか自分自身が抱えてきた内的な葛藤からだけで物語を描いていくということに、5本取った時に少しマンネリを感じ始めた時期でもあるんです。次は自分の中からもう1回また新しい物語が出てくるのかなと思っていた時期にたまたま佐木隆三さんの『身分帳』という作品に出会ったんです。

私は佐木さんの『復讐するは我にあり』という作品は今村昌平監督が映画にもなさってますが、その作品は映画も小説も好きだったので、佐木さんが亡くなったタイミングで今回の『身分帳』という作品を知ることができて読んだ時に非常に『復讐するは我にあり』とは全く違う衝撃を受けたんですよね。陰惨な犯罪の物語ではなくて過去に犯罪を犯した人間がただ当たり前の日常を取り戻していくためにこれだけ苦労があるんだ、という視点の物語をここまで丁寧に描かれたものに初めて出会ったので、私自身からは決して出てこないアイデアですし、自分が脚本家としても監督としてもキャリアアップしていくために、人の書いた物語を今度は自分がスクリプトに起こしてみようという自分にとって新しい挑戦としてそのようなトライをしてみました。

3。西川さんの中で、『復讐するは我にあり』のような作品のリメイクや映画化を考えられたことがありますか。

やっぱり人間っていう得体の知れないものであるということを今村監督も戦後突き詰められたと思うので、私自身もその迫力も含めてとても尊敬していますし。今どうしてもわかりやすい人間像を映画で描かないとヒットしないとか、物語とか人物の置き方も非常に善と悪で分けた描き方をしてしまうんですけれども、映画が表現できることってもっと豊かなことだと思いますしもっと複雑なことだと思うので、『復讐するは我にあり』ほど血なまぐさい作品ではないですが、やっぱり人間存在の難しさとか複雑さは今回も意識して作りました。

4。『素晴らしき世界』において、三上が下稲葉のところに戻るシーンが短かったんですが、ヤクザたちはすぐに骨抜きになり、とても重くて容赦のない印象が残りました。ヤクザが社会的な力や影響力を失っていることはヤクザの現状に対して監督ご自身の認識でしょうか。カテゴリーとしてのヤクザ映画は今の時代でどんな影響があるのでしょうか。

今から10年ほど前からそういうヤクザの社会に対しての法律がずいぶん変わりまして、それまではみんなが黙認した中で彼らも存在していたんですけれども、すっかり社会から締め出される状態になってしまって。暴力団なんて世の中からなくなったほうがいいんでしょうけれど、反面その社会の表立ったところで生きていけなかった人たちの身を寄せる唯一の集団だった部分もあって。ヤクザをやめなさいと法律は言って彼らを締め出すんだけれども、やめた後にどうやって社会復帰させていくのかというところのケアに関してはまったく社会が受け皿を作ってこなかったんですよね。なのでやっぱりヤクザ社会も昔の日本のヤクザ映画のファンの方は世界中にいらっしゃると思うんですけど、ああいう華やかさとか闇の世界だけどみんながちょっと憧れるようなものっていうのはもう一切なくなってきていると思います。なのである種社会悪だった人たちが今も弱者になっているんですね、どこにも行き場のないから。それは私自身がずっと意識してきたことというよりも今回の小説に出会ったことから様々なリサーチをして実際に元暴力団員だった人だとかそういう方に話を聞きながら足を洗った後に社会に出て普通の人として暮らすことの難しさという言葉を聞きながら脚本により膨らませてきましたね。

日本においてはヤクザ映画もほぼなくなってきているんじゃないですかね。ですから今年くしくもヤクザをモチーフにした作品が3本公開になると思うんですけど、いま公開中の『ヤクザと家族』、それから私の作品、そしてたぶん8月ぐらいには白石監督の『孤狼の血2』という作品。やっぱりヤクザが栄華を誇ったのはもう過去の物語であって、今はもうまったく立ち行かない状態になっているというのをどの作品も描いていると思います。でもじゃないけど憧れる存在じゃないし高倉健さんはもう日本にはいない。

5。『素晴らしき世界』の中で、テレビディレクターとプロデューサーはより冷酷で商業的なテレビ業界に生きているんですね。そしてそのディレクターがそういう傾向を拒否し、三上の死を深く悼みました。具体的に彼が何を悼んでいるんでしょか、父親みたいな存在か、日本からもう消えている何かの象徴か、それともすでに変わった社会システムなのでしょうか。

直接の答えになっているかどうかはわかりませんけれども、この作品には実在のモデルがいまして、その人と作者の佐木隆三さんが4年間しっかり付き合った上で書かれた小説なのです。最初は『身分帳』というものがモデルの本人から送りつけられてきて「これをネタに小説にしてくれ」と言われて、佐木さん自身が「またそういう売り込みか」とうんざりしていたらしいんですけれども、やっぱり身寄りもなく誰も頼る人もおらず、ともすればもう一回犯罪を犯してしまうかもしれない危ういモデルの人物ですね。彼自身が小説を書くために付き合いながらだんだん佐木さん自身にとってとてもほってはおけない人間になっていったんだと思うんです。だから本当だったら誰からも忘れ去られて誰にも顧みられないような悪いことばっかりやってきたような人物もすごく近い距離でその人生を見つめて寄り添っていくとやっぱり誰にとってもかけがえのない存在になり得るし、やっぱり人間存在って何一つ無意味なものってないのではないかなというふうに私はそれを読んだときに思いましたので、社会に不必要だと言われがちな人間の存在に対して観客も目を凝らして観ていただきたいなと思って、その心境と共に描いていきました。

6。三上というキャラクターを作る時に、西川監督にとってはドキュメンタリーというよりフィクションの方がやりやすかったんですか。

私はドキュメンタリストではなく劇映画のディレクターですから、当然劇映画のスタイルで描いてはいくんですけれども、こういう社会的なテーマっていうのは、実際の人たちを撮って伝えるっていうのはとても説得力がある反面、やっぱり社会の人にとっては見たくないことであって、あんまり耳をふさぎたくなるようなテーマだと思うんです。だからこそ劇映画としてある種の娯楽性であるとか俳優たちの魅力も借りて描いていくことで、そういうものに一切関心がなかった人たちにも届けやすくなるかなと思いまして、その辺はフィクションとドキュメンタリーの役割の違いだと思うので、私はそれをフィクションの形で多くの人に見られる方法をとってみました。

7。もし三上という人物は女性でしたら、この物語はどの様に変わるんでしょうか。

えーー考えこともない!三上が女性?笑。全然違う人生ですよね。まず女性と男性の犯罪者の数というのはとても差が大きいと思いますけれど。どうかなーー今全然違うように言いましたけど、でももし刑務所から出てきたときに頼る人間が一人もいないとか、家族もいない友人もいない中で、たった一人で人生をやり直していくということの難しさっていうのは、三上ほど暴力に訴えたりということはないにせよ女性でも相当難しいとは思いますし、やはり自分の過去をずっと引きずりながら生きていく息苦しさはあると思うんですよね。ゆっくり考えてみたいですね。全然考えたこともなかったですけど、女性であればまた別の苦労があるでしょうね。ちょっと課題にさせてください。ほんとに面白いと思います。

8。西川さんが2003年に『蛇イチゴ』で監督デビューされまして、この十数年間二十年間日本の映画界は女性監督に対してよりオープンになったと思われますか。何か大きな変化がありましたか。

欧米のようにドラスティックな変化というのはないと思います。だけれども女性の監督というのは確実に増えています。日本の映画監督になるには長い助監督としての下積みがかつては必要で、10年20年積み上げた後にやっと映画監督になれるというのが通常のコースだったんですけれども、やっぱり撮影機材の変化に伴って、もっとよりコンパクトにキャリアができ、スタッフキャリアのない人でも自分の才能をどこかでプレゼンテーションできる機会が増えて、若い女性監督が増えたのは実際にあると思います。ですけど、女性監督を増やすためにということを映画業界全体が何か意思を持って取り組んでいるかと言えばそれはまだ私の周辺では見られません。監督だけじゃなくて技術スタッフもある程度キャリアを積んでいかないと優れた技術者になれないのは皆そうですから、たくさん技術のスタッフの中にも女性が増えてきているんですけれども、やっぱり結婚して家庭を持ったりとか子供を育てていくということと両立させながら映画の現場というハードワークをこなしていくということに断念する女性たちはたくさん私も見きたんです。せっかく優秀で真面目で優れた人なのに家庭を持ちたいからここで引退するっていう人もいらっしゃったので、そういうところでの環境改善ということにやっぱりもっとプロデューサーであるとか出資者が理解して環境を変えていかないとこの先も監督だけではなくカメラマンも照明技師や録音技師も女性はなかなか長く続けていくということは難しいかなと思っています。

8.2。女優さんの場合も同じような状況ですか。

女優さんの方が割と年をとっても続けていけてきたんじゃないですか、日本でも。それがでもやっぱりエージェントのバックアップもあると思います。出産されたり結婚されたりしても守ってくれる人たちがやっぱりある一定以上のクラスの俳優にはそういう人たちがいるんですけれども。やっぱりスタッフっていうのはほぼ全員フリーランスなんですよ。だから自分の生活とか自分の暮らしっていうものは自力で守らなざるを得なくて、そういう意味で続けて生きづらいっていうのはあったんでしょうね。ただ女性の若いスタッフもたくさん増えていますので、やっぱり私たちがこれからもいろんなスタイルで映画に関わることをやめなければゆっくりでも人数は増えてくるとは思ってます。

9。西川監督と同じ時代の監督の何人かが海外、特にフランスで映画を制作されましたが、西川監督も挑戦してみたいと思われますか。

モチーフによると思います。決して日本でしか絶対に映画を撮らないと思っているわけではないですけれども、やっぱり日本で生まれて言語もカルチャーも日本のことしか知らない私が、フランス人のホームドラマを書けるかと言われると朝のコーヒーの入れ方ひとつから違うと思いますから、そこはやっぱりとても苦労すると思います。ただモチーフとして必然性があればそういうことにも挑戦する日もあるかもしれません。

9.2。海外で作品を制作されたら、やはり日本人のストーリーを描かれるんですか。

日本人がゼロの映画は今のところは想像つかないですけどね。両方出てくる映画っていうのがもしかしたらあるかもしれませんね。

10。『素晴らしき世界』に戻ると、梶芽衣子さんを起用されたことについて、少しお聞かせください。

梶さんはやっぱり有名なんですね。やっぱりとても厳しいスタジオシステムの中で男性の中で囲われて、職人らしく仕事をされてきた時代の女優さんだなというふうに思います。もちろんものすごくキャリアが厚い方ですけれども現場に入ってしまうと、本当に1パートというか非常に顕著ですし監督の指示には絶対的に従いますというスタンスです。やっぱりあれだけのスピード感でハードな映画作りを経験されてきた方独特の強さと俳優としての気構えというのがしっかりされた非常に謙虚な女優さんでした。ですけどユーモアがある方で、過去の作品はハードな役が多かったんですけど、梶さんは今回の『素晴らしき世界』の中で演じられた役が持ってるような柔らかさとユーモアのある女性で私はまたぜひ機会があればご一緒したいなと思うようなチャーミングな方だと思います。

11。是枝監督、黒沢監督、河瀨監督など海外で有名な日本の現代映画監督の多くは20世紀の映画作家であり、西川監督は21世紀の監督として、映画作りだけでなく、日本の見る方や伝えたいことについては、前世代と比べてどこが違うと思われますか?

ほんとに初めていただく質問で、難しいな。

是枝監督、黒沢監督、河瀨さん、みんなやっぱり非常にオリジナリティのある監督たちだと思うんですけれども、その人たちが監督として活躍されつつあるときに自分がアシスタントとして映画界に入ってきたので、是枝監督からはとにかく作家性を持ってオリジナルの映画の企画を出すようにというふうに言われて育ったんです。ですので、もしかしたらそんなに差がないんじゃないかと自分は思っています。河瀨さんも、黒沢さんも、是枝監督も、原作のあるものをやられる場合もありますけれども、そのモチーフのチョイスにはそれぞれの個性だとか哲学で選ばれていると思いますし、そういう意味では私も同じようなスタンスで映画は作っております。

ただし、そのたくさんの方が世界でも認められるようになった時代よりも、日本もそうですけど世界的にもやっぱり映画の市場の性格が変わってきているというふうに思います。だから彼らが出てきた時代っていうのはやっぱり日本でも作家性の高いものっていうのがとても大事にされたと思うんですけれども、21世紀に入って特に2010年以降もっと経済的に活性化するもの、お金になる映画作りというのが表的には非常に求められるようになって、作家的な監督が大事にされる時代っていうのは少し過ぎ去りつつあるかなと。私のようなスタンスで映画を作っていく人というのは確かに少ないですし、相当な強固な理解者が周囲にいなければ続けていけなくなっているんですよね。だから私は幸いにもこうやって自分でチョイスしたプランで映画を撮ることができていますけれども、これから先はどうやってお金を稼ぐかということもバランスよく求められていくんではないかなというふうに思いますね。だから映画作りは非常に難しいです。

12。役所さんの話に戻りますが、海外では緒方拳や仲代達矢に次ぐ日本最後の名優と言われています。西川さんにとっても、役所さんが日本における20世紀的な演技の最後の象徴であるのでしょうか?

そうですね。役所さんはどう考えても今の日本の中では最高峰の俳優だと思っておりますし、そこまで更新してくる俳優は来ていないのではないかと思います。ですから黒沢清さんも是枝監督も起用されましたし、今村さんから黒沢清さん、是枝監督、私とジェネレーションは違うけれども、やっぱりずっとその人たちの作品に出演を演じられてきたし私たちがみんな任せたいと思う俳優なんですよね。ですからちょっと役所さんの天下はまだまだ続くなという感じがしますけれど、今生きている監督の中でもやっぱり本当に最高峰の俳優ではないかと思いますし、若い人たちはみんな役所広司さんを目指して俳優たちも自分の演技を考えてくれていると思うので、またちょっと違うシンボルが現れてくれるといいなとご本人も多分思ってるんじゃないでしょうか。

13。『素晴らしき世界』の中で、三上という人物は非常にパワフルな象徴であると思います。血圧を下げるための薬を飲んで生き延びる彼が、やはりヤクザ映画でよくある高倉健さんが演じられたみたいなヒロイックな死を遂げるヤクザのヒーローと違います。三上は単純に薬を落としたから倒れてしまい、それはまた、何かの崩壊、何かの終わりのシンボルだとも思われます。

おっしゃる通りだと思います。高倉健さんが我慢に我慢を重ねて誰かを守るために最後にたった一人で組織に切り込みに行ってヒロイックな死を遂げるというような、ある意味華やかな憧れるようなヤクザ映画というのはもう日本ではまったくリアリティーを持たないですね。それはとてもある種悲しいというか寂しさもあるんですけれどもカルチャーとしては。大衆のある種のヤクザ社会だけが持っていた任侠心の美しさみたいなものももうなくなりつつありますね。

14。黒沢監督や三池監督のように連続的に映画を製作していきたいと思われる監督もいらっしゃいますが、西川監督にとっては、次のプロジェクトの準備がもうできていると感じるまでにはどのくらいの時間がかかりますでしょうか?

だいたい3年から5年の間ですね。オリンピックと同じぐらいのペースで言われるんですけれど、三池監督なんかに関しては私は噂で聞いた話では、誰かから来たオファーを断らないと、そういう風なスタンスであらゆる映画を自分がディレクションするということを矜持になさっていると聞いたことがあります。私はですね、やっぱり自分自身で題材を見つけて、知らないことは自分の足でいろいろこう歩いて取材をしてというところから脚本も入っていくので、しかもちょっと人よりも筆が遅いという、やっぱり題材を見つけて脚本が仕上がるまでに2年ぐらいはかかりますし、そして1年撮影をして仕上げていて、しっかり世界中を回りながら公開していくのでどうしても4年サイクルに今はなっております。

15。もし映画と小説の中からどちらか一つをやめなさいと言われたら、西川さんがどちらを選びますでしょうか。

映画はやめると言ったらいつでもやめれると思いますけど。やっぱりこういう私のような作品のために大きな予算を集めてくるというのはとても大変なことですし、周りのスタッフも非常に負担を抱えながら作っていると思います。ですけども、どっちか一つに絞りなさいともし言われたら私は迷わず映画だけに絞ります。小説は書かなくても大丈夫です。小説はなんて言うんでしょ。自分の体力づくりであったり書く力を衰えさせないためのあくまでも映画をより優れたものにするための自分の体力づくりみたいな感覚でやっていることなので、そこから得るものもたくさんありますけれど、やっぱり映画作りっていうのは自分にとってはもっともっと険しい山なので、できれば映画作りに力を入れてこれからもやっていきたいなと思っています。

16。西川さんは2つのプロジェクトの間にたくさんの映画を見られますか?もしそうだとしたら、特に好きな監督は誰なんでしょうか?それとも全く映画を見ないのですか?

時期にもよりますけど他の方の作品もたくさん見ますよ。

やっぱり同じアジアの監督という意味ではイチャンドンやポン・ジュノに励まされることは多いにありますね。お二人ともまったく方向性が違う作品を作っておられますけれども、アジア映画の範囲の広さというものを世界中に知らしめている監督だと思うので、いつも新作に非常に勇気をいただいております。『パラサイト』もそうですし『バーニング』も素晴らしかったと思います。本当に最近はまだ最新作は拝見してませんけど、これもたまたまアジア系ですけどやっぱりクロエ・ジャオさんの『ザ·ライダー』というものを見せていただいて。彼女はアメリカで活躍をされているからアジア人をモチーフに撮られたわけではないけれども、どこ出身というわけではなく、こういう表現もあるんだなというふうにフィクションの映画のさらに可能性を広げられた若い監督だと思いますし、そういういろんな監督の作品を見て自分にはできていないものをたくさん刺激を受けながら自分もそこに追いつきたいなという気持ちで作品づくりの肥やしにしています。

聞き手:S_Z

2021年2月

0 comments on “On Under the Open Sky & Interview with Dir. Miwa Nishikawa

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: